Recent Industrial/Dark electronic band name generator

March 16, 2012 · Posted in Music · Comment 

The DHS has a “binder” of keywords that they are using to monitor social networks for potential threats; these keywords just happen to be perfect for (often humorous) band names of this type. After reading through them, I put this tool together based on it to add a bit of levity to the subject of mass domestic surveillance. It's available here:

http://www.opir-music.com/ribgen/

More info about the subject:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/24/homeland-security-manual_n_1299908.html

What is Industrial Music?

March 15, 2012 · Posted in Music · Comment 

A perennial topic on many music forums, with way too many definitions that are far too complicated or specific, so let's define what Industrial is now: Industrial has become a Supergenre, like Rock. It does not have one distinct sound, only elements which definite it very, very broadly. Mostly dark, Often harsh, Largely electronic.  That captures many things some would not consider Industrial, but is a lot more useful in practical terms. Once you think of it as a supergenre, it becomes much simpler to conceptualize all the different subgenres. Like with Rock, it serves as a broad identifier of a sound, without attempting to shoehorn it into a particular version.

Rock encompasses everything from The Beatles and Led Zeppelin, to Stone Temple Pilots and Soundgarden, to REM,  to U2 and Radiohead. All Rock, but covering many different eras and different sounds, but with a recognizable thread. So has it become with Industrial. From Throbbing Gristle to Psychic TV, from Skinny Puppy, Front Line Assembly, Ministry, to KMFDM, from Test Department, Merzbow to Converter, from Hocico, Die Sektor, to Grendel, from X Marks The Pedwalk to Icon of Coil. Different sounds, different decades, but with a recognizable underpinning that runs through all of them. 

Thought of this way, many things not considered Industrial come under its rubric: Drum 'n Bass, Dubstep, even traditional Techno of various kinds, not to mention myriad experimental, electronic, noise projects along with a plethora of TV show, video game, and movie scores (shows like MI-5 being a great modern example.) It leaves us with a sense of consistency and way to think about and more easily get a handle on a variety of music styles without getting bogged down in genre soup.

This is an old topic, but at this point in its history, has become worth revisiting. Like Rock, Industrial has reached a new stage in its life, where it has broadened to encompass a large amount of music it may never have been associated with, but it's long past time that it got a new treatment, if only briefly, like in this post.

Occupy Musicians

November 22, 2011 · Posted in Announcements, Music · Comment 

We've recently been included in the "Occupy Musicians" list: http://www.occupymusicians.com/ 

It's for musicians who "support Occupy Wall Street and the Occupy Movement around the world."

Our Restive Zeitgeist: song about protest movements around the world

November 16, 2011 · Posted in Announcements, Lyrics and Explanations, Music, Policy, Politics · Comment 

Listen to this song, Our Restive Zeitgeist, on Bandcamp.

As of this writing, it's been three years since the 2008 financial crisis ended. Over this time, many have wondered just what would happen we finally stopped reeling from the confusion, shock, and bewilderment at the scale of its effects. In 2011, we finally began to move from that previous state to one disappointment and despondency. Around the world, people have wondered just what, collectively, was next. Would we deal with corporate malfeasance; massive financial fraud; abysmal governance; the globalization of capital and faux-free trade that benefits a narrow minority at the expense of the many; growing wealth inequality; crumbling infrastructure; bailouts and corporate socialism; vanishing social mobility and increasing wealth and power concentration? In terms of reforms, it seems we've barely budged from those fateful days of Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers. Much hand-wringing, and "what is to be done?" have occurred, but very little of actual consequence to fix, or even ameliorate our many ills has been accomplished, or in many cases, even attempted in the US or Europe. The social contract in these places has been broken, and no sign of imminent repair appears forthcoming.

The countries of the Middle East and North Africa have been different stories. Suffering for decades under tyrannical regimes, people in these countries have, one after another, been rising up and ousting their rulers. Much of this continues today, and the outcomes remain highly uncertain. Each country, of course, has its own set of unique historical circumstances and local grievances. One thing that has united them, is that in many of these places, a sort of social contract existed: trade your loyalty (and liberties) for guaranteed income streams, a sinecure, and fixed prices for staples. For a variety of reasons, this has broken down; we've been seeing the results.

Aside from the broken social contract, the one thing has united people in all these different regions and countries: disappearing opportunity. We've relied on governments and (mostly large) businesses to remedy our situation, but as has become abundantly clear, no help is coming. The latter was perceived to be reliable out of a mix of national interest-tinged self interest, the former because it is what we elect them to do. Instead, many of these large businesses have become untethered from their home country in this era of frictionless globalized capital, and easy access to low-cost (and in some cases, suffering under Mercantilist regimes) labor. Governments, on the other hand, have succumbed to Neoliberal, non-Ricardian-Free Trade ideology, internal division, pure incompetence, and myopia. Both, of course, have become parties to corruption, influence peddling, and the system of revolving door jobs. These last issues have become a central focus of many extant protest movements (and are the subject of our song "Mussolini's Revenge.")

Now, we've begun to reach a boiling point. Inchoate, at times unfocused, but rapidly coalescing around many of the issues above, this worldwide crisis has been decades in the making, and is the subject of this song. It's particularly focused on the crisis in the US and the attendant "Occupy" protest movement.

Lyrics start with a ">" and are italicized. Full lyrics without the explanation at the bottom.

Read more

June 30, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

 Our song "Rhizostoma Democratica" is now a free download on Soundcloud: http://goo.gl/vGA3d

Opir on Spotify

April 16, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

Thrilled to report that we're finally live on Spotify. 

America: 25 Years In Review on Spotify

Recent comment about Opir on YouTube

April 12, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

 "In a landscape of tawdry, generic, dull and formulaic electronic music designed to maximise revenue for minimal outlay of effort, you have pushed the boundaries and produced something remarkable. Harsh, difficult listening, with a thought provoking message and an underlying, ominous sense of dread."

http://www.youtube.com/user/opirmusic

Opir on Dark Essence radio #220: 21/2/2011

February 25, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

 Our song "Ordain and Establish" was recently played on Dark Essence radio #220: 21/2/2011

Opir on solipsistic NATION No. 224: #twittermix3

January 23, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

Our song "A Graveyard of Elephants" was recently featured in the "Solipsistic Nation" twittermix podcast: 

http://solipsisticnation.com/?p=606

Nearing some first milestones

January 5, 2011 · Posted in Music · Comment 

Opir is getting close to 1000 listeners on last.fm, 1000 plays on Grooveshark and 100 fans (2000 listens) on Jango. We are very excited.

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